Twitter's birdwatch

Twitter’s Birdwatch – A New System to Fight Misinformation


Twitter’s Birdwatch:

 

Twitter Birdwatch is one among the most important problems in social media today is so-called “fake news” which has misled tons of individuals . Which is why Twitter is adding a replacement feature to its platform.

 

Twitter's Birdwatch


Twitter is developing a replacement feature called “Birdwatch,” which is an effort at addressing misinformation across its platform by providing more context for tweets, within the sort of notes.

It lets the Twitter community warn each other about misleading tweets that would cause harm.

The existence of this feature was first discovered by “Jane Manchu Wong,” who often digs through app code for evidence of unreleased features. Below may be a tweet from her:

Twitter is functioning as a moderation tool to watch misinformation son Twitter

Moderators can flag tweets, vote on whether it’s misleading, and add a note about it

(I made up my very own note to point out what it currently looks like) pic.twitter.com/YIa6zt58Fj

— Jane Manchus Wong (@wongmjane) August 5, 2020

 

Tweets are often added to “Birdwatch” from the tweet’s menu, where blocking and reporting tools are found.

Also, a little binoculars icon will appear on tweets published to the Twitter Timeline. If the button is clicked, users are directed to where they will view the tweet’s history of notes.

For Twitter’s Birdwatch feature,

a new tab called “Birdwatch Notes” are going to be added to Twitter’s sidebar navigation. This section will allow you to stay track of your own contributions.

This will be added alongside other existing features like Topics, Lists, Bookmarks, and Moments.

According to Matt Navarre, a social medai guru, Birdwatch allows users to connect notes to a tweet. These notes are often viewed by clicking on the binoculars button on the tweet.

However, additional context about the statements made within the tweet would be hospitable to the public.

 

 

New Twitter feature?

 

 

‘Birdwatch’?! 🐦

Any guesses what it does? pic.twitter.com/1vmpZdTKLi

— Matt Navarre (@MattNavarra) September 30, 2020

What is yet unknown is whether everyone on Twitter are going to be given access to annotate tweets with additional context. Meanwhile, we are yet to understand if this permission requires approval, or only be hospitable to select user or fact-checkers.

 

 

How Twitter’s Birdwatch works

 

Birdwatch combines the crowdsourcing of data, familiar to users of Wikipedia, with ratings almost like Reddit’s system of voting up or down on posts.

Users can write notes on tweets, flagging them as misleading or false. They will even add links to their sources of data.


They also rate each other’s notes — a key a part of the program. Twitter uses those ratings to place the foremost helpful notes at the highest of the list, and to create a reputation profile for Birdwatch users.

In this pilot phase, Birdwatch notes only appear on a separate section of Twitter. Eventually, the thought is to form Birdwatch a part of Twitter’s main platform.

With just thousand participants within the pilot phase immediately, it’s hard to inform whether the project is functioning as Twitter intends.

Some people are using it to correct misleading information, like linking to research showing masks help prevent the spread of COVID-19 on a tweet claiming otherwise.

But there’s also tons of partisan bickering and opinion, especially on tweets from politicians.

“It’s kind of just replicating what we see on Twitter,” said Madelyn Webb, a researcher at the nonprofit First Draft, which combats misinformation. “Things go viral, everybody wants to speak about them then the remainder of it kind of falls to the wayside.”

Twitter’s Coleman says the first phases of the program might not reflect the company’s vision for Birdwatch.

“We knew we might get a mixture of quality,” he said. “The key’s, how can we identify the simplest of it? How can we offer scoring system that permits the community to supply feedback, so we will pull out the simplest of it? And ultimately, how can we encourage more of that over time?”

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